North Carolina Marijuana News

A tobacco-only smoking ban in apartments has been established in San Francisco.

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Whether it’s food, beauty, fitness, or pet care industry, the CBD trend is making its mark on just about every sector. What started with simple oral tinctures, capsules, and vaping solutions has involved into cosmetics, personal-care products, food, drinks, and other consumables – all enriched with cannabidiol (CBD).

CBD is an unstoppable trend that apparently has no limits. Its popularity has increased over the past few years, in response to the softening of Federal and local laws and the commercialisation of CBD oil. Just when you might think there was nowhere left for CBD to go, an unexpected new frontier has appeared.

Today, CBD is joining the fashion world with infused clothing, activewear, and even uniforms for hospital workers. CBD infused apparel is created in the hope of helping people that are prone to chronic pain, muscle soreness, and other ailments. While most people prefer to get potential benefits of cannabidiol from oils, salves, or creams, CBD clothes might be a promising method to receive a positive impact. 

What Is CBD?

CBD, short for Cannabidiol, is a natural substance that is extracted from the Cannabis Sativa plants and usually mixed with carrier oils like hemp seed, coconut, MCT, olive

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Is it legal to sell smokable hemp? Our cannabis and hemp CBD attorneys are asked this question frequently. Without fail, their answer is it that depends on where you want to sell smokable hemp. (We provide a CBD Risk Matrix 50-state survey of the rules and regulations governing the sale of smokable hemp and other Hemp CBD products including ingestible and  cosmetic products). Because state laws, rules, and regulations are changing frequently, sometimes in connection with litigation, we research and update the entries for each state on a monthly basis.

This post is about Indiana, which prohibits the sale of smokable hemp, and a lawsuit that seeks to overturn that prohibition. A bit of background will be helpful. As we wrote in July 2020:

Indiana has long been at the forefront of hemp product regulations. Two years ago in 2018, Indiana passed a comprehensive law that regulated low-THC hemp extracts. At the time, state-level regulation of CBD was mostly limited to medical marijuana programs in conservative states that only allowed CBD extracts for use by medical patients. Very few states were making the distinction for CBD derived from hemp (Hemp CBD) and fewer still were imposing manufacturing,

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In this Following Up feature we return to the former Good Times Hairstyles now the CANJA cannabis shop on Surrey Street where getting buzzed has taken on new significance.

When GuelphToday last spoke to local barber Lore Bortolon in June 2017 he was celebrating 20 years at his shop, Good Times Hairstyles, on Surrey Street and more than 40 years in the barbering business. He had no plans at the time to retire let alone open Guelph’s fourth licensed cannabis shop.

“It wasn’t really on my mind,” he said. “I think you prepare yourself that someday you’ll retire but I was in no hurry.”

– Read the entire article at Guelph Today.

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A United Nations commission voted on Wednesday to remove cannabis for medicinal purposes from a category of the world’s most dangerous drugs, a highly anticipated and long-delayed decision that could clear the way for an expansion of marijuana research and medical use.

The vote by the Commission for Narcotic Drugs, which is based in Vienna and includes 53 member states, considered a series of recommendations from the World Health Organization on reclassifying cannabis and its derivatives. But attention centered on a key recommendation to remove cannabis from Schedule IV of the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs — where it was listed alongside dangerous and highly addictive opioids like heroin.

Experts say that the vote will have no immediate impact on loosening international controls because governments will still have jurisdiction over how to classify cannabis. But many countries look to global conventions for guidance, and United Nations recognition is a symbolic win for advocates of drug policy change who say that international law is out of date.

– Read the entire article at The New York Times.

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A United Nations panel voted on Wednesday to remove cannabis from the list of the world’s most dangerous drugs, a move that could energize legalization efforts around the globe. The decision by the U.N. Commission for Narcotic Drugs reclassifies cannabis under the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, where it was listed on Schedule IV with heroin and other highly addictive and dangerous drugs. 

“This is a huge, historic victory for us, we couldn’t hope for more,” Kenzi Riboulet-Zemouli, an independent researcher for drug policy, told the New York Times.

The commission’s 53 member nations met in Vienna to consider recommendations from the World Health Organization to reclassify cannabis and derivatives of the plant. The recommendations were made by WHO in 2019, but political differences among the member states caused an unusual delay before Wednesday’s vote.

Riboulet-Zemouli had been monitoring the position of the commission’s member nations in anticipation of the vote. The recommendation from WHO was approved by a tally of 27 to 25, with Ukraine abstaining from the vote. The United States and European nations voted in favor of the recommendation, while other nations including China, Egypt, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Russia voted against the proposed change in international

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A non-alcoholic spirit that combines the benefits of hemp with the sophistication and complexity of a fine liquor launched this week, offering a new option for social gatherings or winding down at the end of the day. Dubbed Aplós, the new beverage from the company of the same name is now available exclusively online, providing drinkers and teetotalers alike with a relaxing new experience.

Aplós co-founder and CEO David Fudge, a marketing veteran of powerhouse media companies such as MTV and Esquire and e-commerce brands including Bonobos and Amazon, said that the new product is a retooling of the adult beverage.

“In a world that can often feel overwhelming, where we are looking for a way to unwind without compromising our health, we are setting out to reimagine the adult drinking experience with a first-of-its-kind, functional, plant-based spirit that encourages a return to life’s simple pleasures,”  Fudge said in a press release.

Developed in collaboration with master mixologist and James Beard honoree Lynnette Marrero, Aplós “is citrus-led, bold but nuanced, with notes of rosemary and cardamom, and the complexity and depth to please a sophisticated palate,” the company wrote. “Aplós has the flexibility and combinability of a traditional spirit, in

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CANNABIS CULTURE – Numinus Wellness Inc. and Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Public Benefit Corporation (MAPS PBC) have teamed up to petition Health Canada for approval to begin a trial using MDMA to treat PTSD.

If approval is granted, this will be the first trial of its kind on Canadian soil. Numinus’ Vancouver clinic will host the study, beginning with 20 people who experience treatment-resistant symptoms of PTSD. 

Numinus physicians, clinicians, and staff will undergo training to deliver treatment using the protocol set forth by MAPS, which has conducted research using MDMA to treat PTSD over the last 20 years.

In the announcement released by Numinus today, Amy Emerson, CEO of MAPS PBC said, “Though this treatment is still investigational, if approval is granted through the regulatory pathway this collaboration will bolster our shared goal of addressing the enormous — and growing — need for improved proven treatments for people suffering from PTSD.”

Payton Nyquvest, CEO of Numinus, remarked, “At Numinus, our mandate is to explore and expand patient access to psychedelic-assisted psychotherapies. We are proud to work alongside MAPS in furthering the regulatory landscape for psychedelic-assisted therapies, including MDMA, and setting the stage for the healthcare system of tomorrow.”

The

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We have spilled a good bit of ink on this blog writing about the MORE Act (Marijuana Opportunity and Expungement Act) which is finally headed to a floor vote in the House, probably tomorrow, December 3. The MORE Act ends federal marijuana prohibition and the criminalization of cannabis by descheduling marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). That would be great, of course. Assuming the House version (HR 3884) passes, it will be crucial for the Senate version (S 2227), sponsored by Vice-President-Elect Kamala Harris, to also see daylight in the upper chamber. My guess is it won’t, unless both Democratic candidates prevail in the Georgia runoffs this January, resulting in Mitch McConnell’s replacement as Senate Majority Leader.

But that’s a question for another day. For now, I want to highlight what would happen if the MORE Act does become law someday soon, because I’m seeing some bad information out there. The biggest point of confusion seems to be the idea that if the MORE Act passes, cannabis will become legal nationwide. It won’t. As a matter of federal law, yes, cannabis will be descheduled entirely. And not only that, but all federal marijuana convictions will be expunged—

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